Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Introduction to the Pacific Basin

Winter 2016 (Gandhi 303B)
Professor Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli
Office hours: Mondays and Fridays 3:00- 4:00 p.m.


Introduction to the Pacific Basin

The prospect of exploring the history of the relationship between two areas of the world narrowly defined as the Pacific Rim and Latin America poses an interesting set of challenges. Both areas host hundreds of communities that have had very complicated histories with respect to their national governments and other nations. In this course, the main goal will be to determine some of the most common cultural traits and socio-historical events that shape the discourse of identity in these enormously rich geographical and cultural areas. In outlining a narrative history to our enterprise of inquiry, I have selected readings and films that, for the most part, have to do with violent episodes in the histories of both of these regions. There are several reasons why I have chosen this approach: one, is because I believe that violent periods expose the social and political frictions that, for one reason or another, have been repressed; secondly, the reasons why these violent periods erupted are oftentimes still very controversial (theories about their origins capture the interest of many scholars and artists around the world today); and third, studying the causes of violent periods can often lead to an understanding of efforts to establish peace and justice in the affected communities. This is an interdisciplinary course, and I hope students will be able to engage critically with the materials and explore their disciplinary interests with passion and respect for the diverse views presented in the articles, books, and films that are part of the curriculum.

Goals and Objectives
Some of the goals of this course are: 1) to foster a critical understanding of human rights in the Pacific Basin 2) to determine what organizations and single individuals have done to promote social justice and peace in their communities, and 3) to evaluate the contribution that artists and intellectuals have made to the ways that communities “imagine themselves.” Students will be asked to take copious notes during class discussions and as they complete their readings, and to carry out research for their final essay.

Assignments
Paper #1                                 15% (3 pages)
Paper #2                                 15% (4 pages)
Paper #3                                 20% (6 pages)
4 Short response papers                  25% (1-2 pages each)
Oral Presentations                        10%
Participation                            15%

Written Work
Please type all written work using a standard 12-point font, double-space the text, leave a one-inch margin on all sides, and staple multiple pages. Don’t forget to put your name and course number on the paper. Late papers will be marked down 1/3 grade for each day late.
Please follow the APA Style format for citations and general style formatting. You can find an online version of the APA style manual at:


Schedule of readings
For the most updated schedule of reading please visit the course's wiki (on brightspace)
Required Text
Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2011
COURSE WEBSITE

COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Introduction to the course. Human Rights in the Pacific Basin
TUESDAY February 9
Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Culture as the Ideological Battleground of the Modern World System”.
FILM: Manufactured Landscapes, Dir. Edward Burtynsky.

THURSDAY February 11
Discussion of the Declaration of Human Rights. Dirlik, Arif. “The Asia-Pacific Idea: Reality and Representation in the Invention of a Regional Structure”. What Is In A Rim? Critical Perspectives on the Pacific Region Idea.
Organization of groups: 1) Human Rights 2) War and International Law 3) Culture and the representation of identity 4) History and memory

Week 2: Why China matters.
TUESDAY February 16
Loyalka, Michelle Dammon. Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China's Great Urban Migration. Introduction and Chapter 3.
FILM: Last Train Home, Dir. Lixin Fan (First Part)

THURSDAY February 18
Jenkins, Rhys. “China's Global Expansion and Latin America”.
FILM: Last Train Home, Dir. Lixin Fan (Second Part)

Week 3: The Colonial Years in Latin America (Immigration, Slavery and Race Relations)

TUESDAY February 23
* Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. “Race Construction and Race Relations. Chinese and Blacks in Nineteenth-Century Cuba”. Encounters: People of Asian Descent in the Americas. Ed. Roshni Rustomji-Kerns, Rajini Srikanth and Leny Mendoza Strobel. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999.

THURSDAY February 25
* Skidmore, Thomas E., Aline Helg and Alan Knight. The Idea of Race in Latin America, 1870-1940. Introduction (Richard Gaham) and Chapter 3, “Race in Argentina and Cuba, 1880-1930: Theory Policies, and Popular Reaction "(Aline Helg). Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.

Week 4: The Latin American human rights legacy

TUESDAY March 1
Las Casas, Bartolome. In Defense of the Indians [Selections]

Carozza, Paolo G. “From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights.”

THURSDAY March 3
* Daniels, Roger. “The Japanese Diaspora in the New World: Its Asian predecessors and origins" (in Nobuko Adachi Japanese Diasporas: Unsung pasts...).
* Okihiro, Gary Y. "Acting Japanese" (also Nobuko Adachi).
* Start reading Julie Otsuka's The Buddha in the Attic.
FIRST SHORT RESPONSE DUE ON Sunday March 6 by 6 p.m.!

Week 5: Japanese Immigration to the United States

TUESDAY March 8
* Sunada Sarasohn, Eileen . The Issei: Portrait of a Pioneer: An Oral History (on Angel)
* Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic (1-60)

THURSDAY March 10
* Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic (1-60) discussion continues…

Week 6: SPRING BREAK 3/14-3/18

Week 7: Active Citizenship

TUESDAY March 22
* Loewen, James W. “The Vietnam War in High School American History”. Hein, Laura and Mark Selden. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2000 (on our course's website)
* Luther King, Martin. "Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom (on our course's website)
FILM: The Trials of Muhammad Ali (screened in class)

THURSDAY March 24
Malcom X, "After the Bombing/Speech at Ford Auditorium" (on our course's website)
First Paper due March 27 by 6 p.m.

Week 8: Human Rights Violations in the Southern Cone

TUESDAY March 29
* Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. Preface, Int. and Chapter 1

THURSDAY March 31
* Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. Preface, Int. and Chapter 1 (continue)
FILM: The Pinochet Case (sequence screened in class)

WEEK 9: Remembering and forgetting
TUESDAY April 5
* Sturken, Marita. “Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reenacting the Japanese Internment”. Fujitani, T., Geofrey M. White, and Lisa Yoneyame, Editors. Perilous Memories: The asia-Pacific War(s). Durham: Duke University Press, 2001.
FILM: History and Memory (screened in class)

THURSDAY April 7
Jelin, Elizabeth. "The Minefields of Memory" (on course’s home page)

Week 10: Trauma, families and national histories

TUESDAY April 12
G. B. Tran's Vietnamerica: A family’s journey. First Part
SECOND SHORT RESPONSE DUE ON ANGEL, April 10th, at 6 p.m.

THURSDAY April 14
 Tran, G. B. Vietnamerica: A family's journey. Second part

Week 11: Identity, ethnicity, national identity and genocide

TUESDAY April 19
Adam, Jones. "Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge".
FILM: The Missing Picture, dir. Rithy Panh.

THURSDAY April 21
Discussion of "The Missing Picture".
Welaratna, Usha. "Sophie's Conflicts".
Organize groups for presentations.

SATURDAY April 23
Field trip to San Juan Capistrano and Little Saigon (to be confirmed).

Second Paper due April 24 by 6 p.m.

Week 12: The Pacific War

TUESDAY April 26
Dower, John W. " 'An aptitude for being unloved' ": war and memory in Japan". Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World.

THURSDAY April 28
Renov, Michael. "Warring Images: Stereotype and American Representations of the Japanese, 1941-1991".
THIRD SHORT RESPONSE DUE APRIL 30 by 6 p.m.

Week 13: The Pacific War

TUESDAY, May 3
* Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War [Chapter selections for student presentations]

THURSDAY, May 5
* Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War  [Chapter selections for student presentations]
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

Week 14: The Pacific War
The Lessons of War (cont.)

TUESDAY, May 10
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS (if need)

THURSDAY, May 12
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS (if needed)
FOURTH RESPONSE DUE SUNDAY MAY 15 by 6 pm!!!

May 18 to 24: Final's week

Third Paper due March 19, by 6 p.m.

Bibliography

Carozza, Paolo G., "From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights" (2003). Scholarly Works. Paper 581.

Daniels, Roger. “The Japanese diaspora in the New World: Its Asian predecessors and origins.” Japanese Diasporas: Unsung pasts, conflicting presents, and uncertain futures. Ed. Nobuko Adachi. Routledge, 2006. pp. 25-34.

Dower, John W. " 'An aptitude for being unloved' ": war and memory in Japan". Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World. The New Press, 2014.

Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War. Pantheon, 1987.

Dirlik, Arif. “The Asia-Pacific Idea: Reality and Representation in the Invention of a Regional Structure.” What is in a rim?: critical perspectives on the Pacific Region idea. Rowman and Littlefield, 1998.

Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. “Race Construction and Race Relations. Chinese and Blacks in Nineteenth-Century Cuba.” Encounters: People of Asian Descent in the Americas. Ed. Rustomiji-Kerns, Rajini Skrikanth and Leny Mendoza Strobel. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999.

Jelin, Elizabeth . “The Minefields of Memory.” NACLA.

Jenkins, Rhys. “China's global expansion and latin america.” Journal of Latin American Studies , vol. 42, no. 4, Nov. 2010, pp. 809–837.

Jones, Adam. "Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge". Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction. Routledge, 2010.

Las Casas, Bartolomé, and Stafford Poole. In defense of the Indians. Northern Illinois University Press, 1992.

Loewen, James W. “The Vietnam War in High School American History”. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Hein, Laura and Mark Selden. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2000.

Loyalka, Michelle Dammon. Eating bitterness: stories from the front lines of Chinas great urban migration. University of California Press, 2012.

Martin Luther King, Jr. “Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom.” Teaching American History, teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/nonviolence-the-only-road-to-freedom/.

Otsuka, Julie. Buddha in the Attic . Anchor, 2012.

Renov, Michael. "Warring Images: Stereotype and American Representations of the Japanese, 1941-1991." The Culture of Japan as Seen Through Its Leisure. Ed. Linhart,S., and Sabine Frühstück. State University of New York Press, 1998.

Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. Oxford University Press, 1999.

Sarasohn, Eileen Sunada. The Issei, portrait of a pioneer: an oral history. Pacific Books, 1990.

Skidmore, Thomas E., Aline Helg and Alan Knight. The Idea of Race in Latin America, 1870-1940. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.

Sturken, Marita. “Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reenacting the Japanese Internment”. Perilous Memories: The asia-Pacific War(s). Ed. Fujitani, T., Geofrey M. White, and Lisa Yoneyame,. Durham: Duke University Press, 2001.

Tran, GB. Vietnamerica: A Family's Journey. Villard, 2013.

Welaratna, Usha. "Sophie's Conflicts". Encounters: People of Asian Descent in the Americas. Ed. Rustomiji-Kerns, Rajini Skrikanth and Leny Mendoza Strobel. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999.

Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Culture as the Ideological Battleground of the Modern World-system.” The Essential Wallerstein. New York: New Press, 2000
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