Thursday, January 3, 2013

LATIN AMERICAN PERSPECTIVESPolitical Documentary Film and Video in the Southern Cone (1950s-2000s)Issue 188 - Volume 40 - Number 1  


Listen to the podcast in which Outreach Coordinator, Armando Alvarez talks with Tomas Crowder and Antonio Traverso, as well as authors Pablo Piedras and Javier Campo about this thematic issue! (Podcast in Spanish)

Table of Contents 

Introduction


Political Documentary Cinema in the Southern Cone

Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli and Antonio Traverso . . 5

Articles

From Recording to Intervention: History and Documentary Filmmaking in Argentina

Pablo Piedras. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Revisiting the Argentine Political Documentary of the Late 1950s and Early 1960s

Moira Fradinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Anarchism and Counterinformation in Documentaries: From Civil War Spain to Post-2001 Argentina

Antonio Prado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Uruguay 2008: The Year of the Political Documentary

Jorge Ruffinelli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Personal Museums of Memory: The Recovery of Lost (National) HIstories in the Uruguayan Documentaries Al pie del árbol blanco and El círculo

David Martin-Jones and María Soledad Montañez. . . 73

The Split-Person Narrative: Resisting Closure, Resistant Genre in Albertina Carri's Los rubios

Kristi Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Labyrinths and Lines of Memory in Documentary Film:Memoria del saqueo and Los rubios from a Philosophical Perspective


María Belén Ciancio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101

Representing Absences in the Postdictatorial Documentary Cinema of Patricio Guzmán

Patrick Blaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Framing Ruins: Patricio Guzmán's Postdictatorial Documentaries

Juan Carlos Rodríguez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131

Documentary Film from the Southern Cone during Exile (1970-1980)

Javier Campo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145

Spaces Recovered by Memory: Film Language and Testimony in Parot's Estadio Nacional

Gloria Medina-Sancho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161

Forensic Memory, Responsibility, and Judgment: The Chilean Documentary in the Postauthoritarian Era

Walescka Pino-Ojeda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

The Making of Chile: WIth Poems and Guns: A Personal Recollection

Marjorie Woodford Bray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187

Films

Featured Film: Corazón de fábrica (Heart of the Factory)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201

Latin American Dreaming: A Neoliberal Vision for Retirement

Kristi M. Wilson and Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli . . . . . .202

A Passage from the Introduction

Political Documentary Cinema in the Southern Cone

by Antonio Traverso and Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli

Documentary cinema in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay has shown comparable degrees of vibrancy and sophistication since the 1950s, as well as a shared desire to be a key witness to unfolding political events and a protagonist in national and regional processes of social justice. As a result, Southern Cone political documentary cinema today constitutes a substantial body of work that possesses great potential as a source for understanding social change histories in Latin America. This collection of essays looks closely at the strategies utilized by Argentine, Chilean, and Uruguayan political filmmakers to document and participate in social change events, as well as to imagine and reflect upon the past and the future of these three South American nations. The motivation to single out the political documentary of these three southernmost countries within the broader Latin American context responds, first, to the specific historical, social, and cultural bonds that connect these nations within the continent and, secondly, to the fact that their documentary traditions clearly reflect these convergences. Among key points of correlation one should consider especially these nations' early industrialization in the second half of the nineteenth century and the attendant formation of a working class, their long, laborious histories of unionism and workers' struggle, the continuing advancement of popular fronts, their strong socialist traditions and influential leftist organizations, and their histories of military dictatorship, infamously united and coordinated through Operation Condor in the 1970s. Argentine, Chilean, and Uruguayan filmmakers have collaborated and influenced each other at least since the middle of the twentieth century through their documentation of and participation in these closely related political histories.