Thursday, December 6, 2012

The Portraitist


Irek Dobrowolski, Photo by Charles Kerhin

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Solar Mamas


COMMUNITY CINEMA AT SOKA UNIVERSITY PRESENTS

Solar Mamas


a film by Jehane Noujaim

Date: 11.08.2012

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Pauling 216





This documentary follows Rafea — a 30-year-old Jordanian mother of four — who is traveling outside of her village for the first time to attend a solar engineering program at India’s Barefoot College. She will join other poor women from Guatemala, Kenya, Burkina Faso, and Colombia in learning concrete skills to create change in their communities.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

As Goes Janesville

COMMUNITY CINEMA AT SOKA UNIVERSITY PRESENTS 

As Goes Janesville

a film by Brad Lichtenstein

Date: 10.25.2012

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Pauling 216



America's middle class is dwindling, and the debate over how to save it is nowhere fiercer than in the normally tranquil state of Wisconsin. In Janesville, as jobs disappear and families are stretched to their breaking point, citizens and politicians are embroiled in an ideological battle about how to turn things around.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Half the Sky: Cambodian Sex Trafficking

September 27th

7 PM

Soka University of America (Pauling 216)





This landmark transmedia project features a four-hour PBS primetime national and international broadcast event, a Facebook-hosted social action game, mobile games, two interactive websites, educational video modules with companion text, and an impact assessment plan all inspired by Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, the widely acclaimed book by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn.


For this screening we will show the section on Cambodian Sex Trafficking.

Panelists:
Dr. Shane Barter and Dr. Ryan Caldwell.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Monday, April 23, 2012

La Vida Util

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4EuSbE65_1GNVVUSmxsclhIcW8/edit

Film Policy under MERCOSUR: The Case of Uruguay

Tamara L. Falicov

Abstract: This paper explores the cultural dimensions of regional integration that could result from the regional trade pact of the Latin American Southern Cone called MERCOSUR. The aim of this study is to understand whether cultural industries such as film can be aided by state policies that work to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers, this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in any material fashion. This research explores the various reasons for the failure of this policy. The Uruguayan film industry serves as a case study of some of the obstacles to cultural integration.

Introduction

This study explores the ways in which cultural industries such as film are affected by state policies in the Latin American Southern Cone. The essential purpose of these policies, implemented under the regional trade pact MERCOSUR, is to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration. By promoting a network of cross-border film co-operation, this effort could potentially contest (or, in an ideal world, circumvent) Hollywood's dominance in the areas of film production, exhibition, and distribution. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers of the member countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay), however, this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in terms of any definitive, active institutionalized co-production initiatives. This paper examines the various reasons for the failure of this policy. Uruguay and its audiovisual industry demonstrate why the implementation of regional audiovisual policies has not worked under the regional trade agreement MERCOSUR. My research suggests that film production in Uruguay has been aided more on both local and pan-Ibero-American levels than on a regional level.

To read the rest of the article, please click on the following link:

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Cultural Studies Association Conference, UCSD


Seeing is Believing: Documentary Film, Art and the Materiality of Evidence 
4:00-5:45pm • Room: Solis 110

Revisiting memory: Touring Sites of Traumatic memory Kristi M. Wilson, Soka University of America

The 1985 Trials of the Argentine Juntas: Court Testimonies, Visual Documentation, and the Erasure of evidence Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli, Soka University of America.

Documentary Film as Material Witness and Social Conscience in "The Stranger". Jennifer Barker, East Tennessee State University.

Access to Evidence: Film and/as Archive Stephen Cooper, California State University, Long Beach.

Chair: Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli, Soka University of America.

Friday, March 16, 2012

Articulo sobre "Presunto Culpable"

Milenio Online


Tras la sentencia que se emitió la semana pasada, en la que se indica que el documental Presunto culpable saliera de circulación, Marina Stavenhagen, titular del Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (Imcine), reconoció que “ignoro el detalle de cómo salió esta sentencia, habría que conocerla a fondo. De entrada, a nosotros nos parece terrible que se enlate, que se retire de la circulación”.





La historia de Antonio Zuñiga de nueva cuenta vuelve a crear polémica. Foto: Archivo

“Definitivamente hay una reflexión necesaria que tenemos todos pendiente, que es una reflexión sobre el papel del documental, los límites de lo público, lo privado, la ética, la estética y todo aquello que va a aparejado al ejercicio de la creación”, destacó al ser entrevistada en el encuentro de cine y video documental pendiente Contra el silencio todas las voces.

Vive su auge el documental

En medio del crecimiento de la producción cinematográfica nacional, se revela el auge que el género documental vive no sólo en México, sino a nivel mundial.


Para leer el resto del articulo ir al siguiente link:

Chile hace el cine mas interesante de Latinoamerica

RIO - Uma obra suave, rica de observações sensíveis’, definiu o júri do Festival de Roterdã, no início de fevereiro, para justificar a entrega de um de seus três troféus Tigres, os principais da mostra holandesa, para "De jueves a domingo", o longa-metragem de estreia da chilena Dominga Sotomayor. Tratava-se de um prêmio importante para uma jovem cineasta de 26 anos, mas também de uma confirmação: vem do Chile o cinema mais interessante feito na América Latina hoje.

Roterdã repetiu os indícios que vêm sendo dados por festivais como Sundance, Cannes, Berlim ou Veneza, cujas seleções vêm abrindo cada vez mais espaço para a produção de uma nova geração chilena. É uma situação semelhante ao que ocorreu há uma década com os filmes pós-crise financeira do cinema argentino ou com os favela movies do cinema brasileiro. A maior diferença é que, no Chile atual, os filmes não surgem de problemas econômicos ou sociais. São originados de um cinema suave, rico de observações sensíveis.

Leia mais sobre esse assunto em http://oglobo.globo.com/cultura/chile-faz-cinema-mais-interessante-da-america-latina-4319040#ixzz1pIYJgCY7
© 1996 - 2012. Todos direitos reservados a Infoglobo Comunicação e Participações S.A. Este material não pode ser publicado, transmitido por broadcast, reescrito ou redistribuído sem autorização.

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Drama social folclórico

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B4EuSbE65_1GRG9xamdHX2RSZ0dJTWFibEJWSGh0UQ

NUEVO TEXTO CRITICO, EMERGENCIAS Y TENSIONES

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B4EuSbE65_1GTUhGU1R0al9Uci1HNkliUzE5cDFLZw

Cuadernos de Cine argentino

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B4EuSbE65_1Gb2EtYTZfcTBTeHFsc2lNaTNLckVNQQ

STRONG!



Date: 05.10.2012

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Pauling 216




A formidable figure, standing at 5'8" and weighing over 300 pounds, Cheryl Haworth struggles to defend her champion status as her lifetime weightlifting career inches towards its inevitable end. Strong! chronicles her journey and the challenges this unusual elite athlete faces, exploring popular notions of power, strength, beauty, and health.

Special Panelists:
Gigi Freeman- Director of Cross Country/Track & Field at Soka University of America

Jeanette DePatie- (AKA The Fat Chick) A plus-sized, certified fitness teacher, marathoner, triathlete, author and public speaker who has spent nearly two decades helping thousands of people who haven't exercised in a while (or ever) learn to love their bodies and love exercise again. In her roles as Vice President of the Association of Size Diversity And Health and spokeswoman for NAAFA-LA, Jeanette advocates for the Health At Every Size® approach to wellness. Jeanette recently released a book and DVD "The Fat Chick Works Out! (Fitness that's Fun and Feasible for Folks of All Ages, Shapes, Sizes and Abilities)" and has recently teamed up with Ragen Chastain to release a new forum for exercisers of size (fitfatties.com). You can learn more about Jeanette, her live and web streamed classes, personal training program, book, DVD and blog on her web site (thefatchick.com).

Hell and Back Again

Date: 04.19.2012

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Location: Pauling 216





What does it mean to lead men in war? What does it mean to come home - injured physically and psychologically - and build a new life? HELL AND BACK AGAIN that asks and answers these questions with the conflict in Afghanistan as the backdrop. Two overlapping narratives intercut: the life of a Marine on the war front, and the life of the same Marine in recovery at home – creating a realistic depiction of how Marines experience this war.

The story follows the U.S. Marines Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, as they launch a major assault on a Taliban stronghold in Southern Afghanistan. Within hours of being dropped deep behind enemy lines, Sergeant Nathan Harris's unit is attacked from all sides. Cut off and surrounded, the Marines fight a ghostlike enemy and experience immense hostility from displaced villagers. Frustration grows on both sides, as any common ground, or success, seems elusive.

The parallel story begins with Sergeant Harris's return home to his wife in the U.S., after he is severely injured. He's in terrible physical pain, and becomes addicted to his pain medication. But his psychological pain may be worse, as he attempts to reconcile the immense gulf between his experiences at war, and the terrifying normalcy of life at home. These two stories intertwine to communicate both the extraordinary drama of war and the no less shocking experience of returning home, as a whole generation of Marines struggles to find an identity in a country that prefers to be indifferent.


Special Panelists:
Dr. Ryan Caldwell, Soka University of America, author of Fallgirls: Gender and the Framing of Torture at Abu Ghraib (2012).

Kristen Parrinello, former member of the U.S. Navy and member of The Mission Continues, which helps veterans use their skills in their communities.


http://www.missioncontinues.org/Programs/fellows/details/130

More Than a Month

Date: 03.15.2012
Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Pauling 216




Shukree Hassan Tilghman, a 29-year-old African American filmmaker, is on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. Through this tongue-in-cheek journey, More Than a Monthinvestigates what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a "post-racial" America.

The Independent Television Service (ITVS), KOCE-TV (PBS) and Soka University of America are pleased to announce the third year of the Community Cinema series, which begins in September 2011. The largest public interest outreach program in public or commercial television, Community Cinema features a sneak peek of nine documentaries set to broadcast on the award-winning PBS series Independent Lens. Community Cinema, in partnership with the Humanities Program and Student Affairs, screens films monthly from September through May.

After the screenings, Community Cinema features panel discussions with leading community based organizations, special guest speakers, information, resources, and other programming designed to help our students and our community learn more about the issues and get involved. The panel for this film will include Jared Sexton, an Associate Professor of African American Studies and Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Irvine.

Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock



Date: 02.23.2012

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Pauling 216




As a black woman who was a feminist before the term was invented, Daisy Bates refused to accept her assigned place in society. Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock tells the story of her life and public support of nine black students who registered to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, which culminated in a constitutional crisis — pitting a president against a governor and a community against itself. Unconventional, revolutionary, and egotistical, Daisy Bates reaped the rewards of instant fame, but paid dearly for it.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Entrevista a Jorge Perugorria

Interesante nota donde Perugorria habla del cine Cubano actual

Por Oscar Ranzani, Pagina 12

CULTURA › JORGE PERUGORRIA HABLA DE CINE, TELEVISION Y LA ACTUALIDAD CUBANA: “Ahora los jóvenes tienen más espacios para hacer cine”

El protagonista de Fresa y chocolate presenta una serie de TV que estrenará en marzo, junto a Natalia Oreiro, donde prima el humor negro. Y a raíz de su compromiso con el cine cubano reflexiona sobre la realidad de la isla y su apertura cultural

“Hay mucha gente que necesita amor, gente que necesita reconocimiento y hay gente que necesita morirse. Y esa gente es la que atiende Lynch en su funeraria.” La frase jocosa y, a la vez macabra, la pronuncia el actor más famoso de Cuba, Jorge Perugorría –el coprotagonista de Fresa y chocolate–, para definir a su personaje, Jerónimo Lynch, el empresario que representará en la serie Lynch que la señal televisiva Moviecity estrenará en marzo. Pichi Perugorría compone al dueño de la funeraria El Descanso Eterno que se dedica al, “negocio” de armar muertes y entierros falsos para personas en problemas que necesitan tener una nueva identidad. “Es un hombre común que, de pronto, por la circunstancia en la que se encuentra con su familia y su funeraria, entra en este `negocio’, pero es alguien que se levanta todos los días a la misma hora, se viste igual que cualquiera, come lo mismo que cualquier otro”, justifica el actor a su personaje. Tras catorce años de haber sido abandonado por Isabel (Natalia Oreiro), su mujer, Lynch se reencuentra con ella cuando acude a la funeraria, herida y asustada y con la necesidad de cambiar su identidad, pidiendo “muerte” y “resurrección”. Pero las cosas no serán tan fáciles, especialmente porque Isabel no sólo abandonó a Jerónimo Lynch sino también al hijo de la pareja que, por ese entonces, era un bebé.

Para leer el resto del articulo ir al siguiente link:

Wednesday, February 15, 2012


Film Policy under MERCOSUR: The Case of Uruguay

By: Tamara L. Falicov (2002)

Abstract: This paper explores the cultural dimensions of regional integration that could result from the regional trade pact of the Latin American Southern Cone called MERCOSUR. The aim of this study is to understand whether cultural industries such as film can be aided by state policies that work to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers,this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in any material fashion. This research explores the various reasons for the failure of this policy.The Uruguayan film industry serves as a case study of some of the obstacles to cultural integration.

Introduction

This study explores the ways in which cultural industries such as film are affected by state policies in the Latin American Southern Cone. The essential purpose of these policies,implemented under the regional trade pact MERCOSUR, is to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration.By promoting a network of cross-border film co-operation, this effort could potentially contest (or, in an ideal world, circumvent) Hollywood's dominance in the areas of film production, exhibition, and distribution. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers of the member countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay), however, this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in terms of any definitive, active institutionalized co-production initiatives. This paper examines the various reasons for the failure of this policy. Uruguay and its audiovisual industry demonstrate why the implementation of regional audiovisual policies has not worked under the regional trade agreement MERCOSUR. My research suggests that film production in Uruguay has been aided more on both local and pan-Ibero-American levels than on a regional level.


This is a very interesting 12-page article that can be found at the following link: 

From “Third Cinema” to “Latin American film”


Written by Samantha Holland , May 16

Globalisation, national identity and the demise of political filmmaking

This article stems from concerns I have about the label “Latin American film,” or “Latin American cinema,” because the films to which it refers are so diverse, but the label homogenises them – and, by extension, the cultures from which they emerge. My concern is not primarily about the use of the term by people interested in film and culture – such as community members on this site! – but by the global film industry and by cultural theorists (where the former have vested interests in the label, and the latter should know better). In presenting some of these concerns, I describe changes that have lead to the widespread use and acceptance of this label, as well as aspects of the history of films and filmmaking in Latin American countries that makes such a label problematic for me and more generally.


Some recent developments in “Latin American cinema”

It’s no exaggeration to claim that what we currently call “globalisation” has since the 1990s changed the production and distribution of films from several Latin American countries almost beyond recognition and, as a result, changed the very perception of what is now generally termed “Latin American cinema” or “Latin American film.” And terminology is crucial here – both to the issues I discuss, and to the concerns I raise. Especially significant is that while many of the countries I’m discussing were until recently called “developing countries,” they’re now termed “emerging markets” – something that’s happened as free-trade ideas and practices spread across the subcontinent and its governments lessen their involvement in filmmaking. The term “emerging markets” immediately shifts the identities at issue from national to commercial ones – something perhaps especially significant in the context of Latin American countries, for which the expression of national identities has been so important and so central to filmmaking, and for which commercial success was until comparatively recently neither a crucial aim nor a particular indicator of success.

To read the rest of the article please click on the following link: 

Latin pic marts sizzle:
Markets flourish, boosted by buying spree

Sat., Apr. 9, 2011 By JOHN HOPEWELL, JAMES YOUNG

GUADALAJARA, Mexico -- One decade ago, most Latin American national film industries were struggling for survival.

Now, after production levels have boomed in most territories -- Argentina alone made 154 features last year -- they're battling for the keys to further growth.

A dynamic clutch of dedicated national, mini-regional and pan-Latin American film markets are aimed at boosting exports and co-productions for young, but fast-maturing local production sectors.

Mexico's Guadalajara mart, under 2006-10 director Jorge Sanchez, built up its Film Market and Ibero-American Co-production Meeting, and imported Cannes' Producers Network and a Guadalajara Construye rough-cut section.

This week's Buenos Aires' Bafici Festival boasts a prestigious works-in-progress section, a BAL co-production forum and Puentes, a Europe-Latin America meet.

Buenos Aires' Ventana Sur, a custom-built mart for Latin American pics combining the strength of its organizers, Cannes' Film Market and Argentina's Incaa film institute, has taken Latin American film markets to the next level.

At least 300 buyers and 1,960 non-Latin American participants attended the second edition of Ventana Sur in December.

To read the rest of the article, click on the following link:
Latin American Film Industry May Receive Boost in the Global Recession

FEBRUARY 13, 2009by Danielle Renwick

In the last few months conventional wisdom has said that all bets are off when it comes to investments. While most sectors of the economy are starving for cash and credit, Latin American film makers are hoping to attract foreign investors looking to lower costs by investing in non-U.S. projects.

Andres Calderón, executive producer at Dynamo capital, was in New York last week to test that hypothesis. Calderón, who worked as an investment banker for eight years before joining the Colombian production firm Dynamo, is hoping that the credit crunch affecting Hollywood will provide new opportunities for Latin American movie makers.
To see the rest of the article click the following link:


Friday, February 10, 2012

10th Annual Soka Education Conference 2012

SPECIAL INTEREST WORKSHOP
Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli
Media Literacy or media without Literacy 
Sunday, February 19
1:20 p.m. Pauling 216

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Netflix less about flicks, more about TV

By Ben Fritz and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times

Like most fresh faces that arrive in Hollywood,Netflix wanted to be a movie star.

But now it's learning what many in Tinseltown have known for decades: Movies are sexy, but the real money is in television.

Launched in 1997 with a goal of eliminating the drive to the video store, Netflix Inc. became a hit with consumers and helped push the movie rental chainBlockbuster into bankruptcy. By charging customers a small monthly fee for unlimited DVDs by mail, then expanding into Internet streaming in 2007, it amassed almost 25 million subscribers in the U.S. and in 2011 had revenue of $3.2 billion.

For most of that time, Netflix was all about flicks. More than 80% of the discs it shipped and virtually all of its streaming content when that service began consisted of movies.

Not anymore. More than 60% of the 2 billion-plus hours of video streamed by Netflix subscribers during the fourth quarter of 2011 originated on the small screen.

To see the rest of the article please click on the following link:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/la-fi-ct-netflix-20120205,0,6552350.story