Wednesday, February 2, 2011

2011-2012 Community Cinema Season


Producing Partners/Coordinators: Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli, Nolina Doud, Juliann Petkov, Kathrine Filippi. 

The Independent Television Service (ITVS) and Soka University of America are pleased to announce the third year of Community Cinema program, which begins in September. The largest public interest outreach program in public or commercial television, Community Cinema features a sneak peek of nine documentaries set to broadcast on the award-winning PBS series Independent Lens.


Community Cinema, in partnership with the Humanities Program and Student Affairs, screens films monthly from September through May (most screenings are in Pauling 216, but check for locations on the Soka calendar website).

After the screenings, Community Cinema features panel discussions with leading community based organizations, special guest speakers, information, resources, and other programming designed to help our students and our community learn more about the issues and get involved. 



Highlights of our upcoming season at Soka University of America!


September 22nd, Pauling 216


Peace Unveiled
When the U.S. troop surge was announced in late 2009, women in Afghanistan knew that the ground was being laid for peace talks with the Taliban. Peace Unveiled follows three women who immediately began to organize to make sure that women have a seat at the negotiating table. One is a savvy parliamentarian who participated in writing the Afghan constitution that guarantees equality for women; another, a former midwife who is one of the last women’s rights advocates alive in Kandahar; and the third, a young activist who lives in a traditional family in Kabul. Convinced that the Taliban will have demands that jeopardize women’s hard-earned gains, they maneuver against formidable odds to have their voices heard in a peace jirga and high peace council. We go behind Kabul’s closed doors as the women’s case is made to U.S. Ambassador Karl Eikenberry, U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer, General David Petraeus and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who promises the women that “peace and justice can’t come at the cost of women and women’s lives.” But will this promise be kept? Narrated by Tilda Swinton.


October 13th, Pauling 216


Deaf Jam
National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In Deaf Jam a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations, and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry — eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers.


November 17th


We Still Live Here (Âs Nutayuneân)
The Wampanoag nation of southeastern Massachusetts ensured the survival of the first English settlers in America, and lived to regret it. AS NUTAYUNEAN - We Still Live Here tells the story of the return of the Wampanoag language, the first time a language with no Native speakers has been revived in this country. Spurred on by an indomitable linguist named Jessie Little Doe, the Wampanoag are bringing their language and their culture back.


December 1st


Taking Root
How does the simple act of planting trees lead to winning the Nobel Peace Prize? Ask Wangari Maathai of Kenya. In 1977, she suggested rural women plant trees to address problems stemming from a degraded environment. Under her leadership, their tree-planting grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard the environment, defend human rights and promote democracy, earning Maathai the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004.


February 23rd


Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock
As a black woman who was a feminist before the term was invented, Daisy Bates refused to accept her assigned place in society. The life of Daisy Bates tells the story of her life and public support of nine black students to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, which culminated in a constitutional crisis--pitting a president against a governor and a community against itself.


March 15th


February- More Than a Month
Shukree Hassan Tilghman, a 29-year-old African American filmmaker, is on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. Through this tongue-in-cheek journey, MORE THAN A MONTH investigates what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a "post-racial" America.


April 19th


Hell and Back Again
What does it mean to lead men in war? What does it mean to come home - injured physically and psychologically - and build a new life? HELL AND BACK AGAIN that asks and answers these questions with the conflict in Afghanistan as the backdrop. Two overlapping narratives intercut: the life of a Marine on the war front, and the life of the same Marine in recovery at home – creating a realistic depiction of how Marines experience this war.


May 10th


Strong!
A formidable figure, standing at 5'8" and weighing over 300 pounds, Cheryl Haworth struggles to defend her champion status as her lifetime weightlifting career inches towards its inevitable end. STRONG! chronicles her journey and the challenges this unusual elite athlete faces, exploring popular notions of power, strength, beauty and health.


For more information about the films and Community Cinema visit:
http://www.itvs.org/engagement
You can also become a friend of ITVS Soka on Facebook!